What does the EU Withdrawal Bill mean for devolution? A visual guide.

Darllenwch yr erthygl yma yn Gymraeg | View this post in Welsh

On 13 July 2017 the UK Government introduced the EU (Withdrawal) Bill into the House of Commons. One of the elements of the Bill that has caused greatest debate since its publication is the impact the Bill will have on the devolved settlements. Differences have emerged in the views as to where powers over areas such as agriculture and fisheries should ‘return’ to after the UK exits the EU. The First Ministers’ of Wales and Scotland have described the Bill as a ‘naked power-grab’ whilst the UK Government has outlined their view that the Bill maintains ‘the​ ​current​ ​decision making​ ​powers​ ​of​ ​the​ ​devolved​ ​institutions’.

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New Publication: The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill: An introductory guide

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On 13 July 2017 the UK Government introduced the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill. The Bill sets out the procedures and processes by which the current body of EU law will be converted into UK law upon the UK’s exit from the EU. This paper provides an introductory guide to the key provisions if the Bill, why the Bill is needed, the expected timeline for the Bill and how the Bill will impact on the legislative competence of the Assembly and the powers of Welsh Ministers.

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Protecting agricultural workers in Wales

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The Welsh Government is currently consulting on the effectiveness of the Agricultural Sector (Wales) Act 2014. The Act aims to support a ‘resilient, sustainable and well-trained agricultural sector in Wales’, and in particular, regulates agricultural wages. The Act contains a ‘sunset clause’, meaning it will cease to have effect after 30 July 2018 if no new legislation is made to preserve it. The Welsh Government will use the outcome of the consultation to help it decide whether or not to maintain, amend or discontinue the Act.

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What does the EU (Withdrawal) Bill mean for Wales and devolution?

Darllenwch yr erthygl yma yn Gymraeg | View this post in Welsh

On 13 July 2017, the UK Government introduced the EU (Withdrawal) Bill into the UK Parliament. The Bill – which was formerly referred to as the Great Repeal Bill or Repeal Bill – aims to make the changes the UK Government considers necessary to law in the UK in preparation for the UK’s exit from the EU.

The White Paper leading to the Bill, Legislating for the United Kingdom’s Withdrawal from the European Union, was published on 30 March 2017. You can read more about it in our blog.

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A Stronger Voice for Wales: First Minister to give evidence

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How an Assembly committee is investigating relations between institutions.

The Constitutional and Legislative Affairs Committee  is undertaking an inquiry into inter-institutional working in order:

  • To produce best practice principles for inter-institutional working for constitutional legislation.
  • To reflect and build on the work of other legislatures on inter-institutional working as it relates to broader policy areas.
  • To seek, establish and promote opportunities for inter-parliamentary working, including promotion of citizen engagement.

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Devolution of energy and environmental powers: is the new settlement a lasting one in the face of Brexit?

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The devolution settlement is changing under the Wales Act 2017 which received royal assent on 31 January 2017. This article explores what this means for energy and environmental powers in Wales, and also highlights the different attitudes to the devolution of powers following withdrawal from the EU.

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The Wales Bill passes the Assembly and Parliament

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On Tuesday 17 January 2017 the National Assembly for Wales debated a Legislative Consent Motion on the Wales Bill. According to a convention (“the Sewel Convention”) the UK Government would not normally bring forward or support proposals to legislate in relation to Wales on subjects in which the Assembly has legislative competence without the Assembly’s consent. The consent of the Assembly is gained via a Legislative Consent Motion (LCM). The Wales Bill changes the powers of the Assembly therefore an LCM was required.

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